Marquand Editions ~ Washington
(Ed Marquand)

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Marquand Editions: "Established in 2007, our studio in Tieton, Washington, combines nineteenth-, twentieth-, and twenty-first-century technologies to further the art of the book. We produce limited-edition volumes, artists’ books, handmade cases, and unusual small-run publications for artists and publishers.

"Anchored by the traditions of letterpress printing and artisan binding and case-making, the Tieton studio augments the craft of the handmade book with laser cutting, plotter cutting, and digital and screen printing to create thoroughly modern objects."

Ed Marquand: "Even the most bookish among us now rely on electronic forms of information retrieval for fun and serious research. This makes the tactile pleasures of holding and reading a book of extraordinary quality a particular delight."

   

The Nuno Box: Textiles of Reiko Sudo
Textiles by Nuno
Designed by Ed Marquand, Reiko Sudo, and Alfred Birnbaum
Seattle, Washington: Lucia/Marquand Editions, 2017.
Edition of 50 + 5 lettered hors commerce copies.

1.25 x 10.25 x 10.5" with 4 trays. Tray 1: Title sheet, two pamphlet sewn books, scarves. Tray 2: Collages. Tray 3: Nunology Notebook. Tray 4: Tray within tray of tools and raw materials. Texts, translation, editing, and coordination by Allred Birnbaum. Letterpress printed by Steve Morgan. Binding by Maria Solorio, Edward Armstrong, Teresa Martinez, and Serena Morgan. Produced at Paper Hammer Studios. Signed by Reiko Sudo, Alfred Birnbaum, and Ed Marquand. Numbered.

Marquand Editions: "Reiko Sudo is one of the great textile designers working today. Her talent is admired internationally, and her innovative designs are part of the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art, Cooper-Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and many others.

"140 distinct textiles are represented in this book/object. It houses three scarves, a notebook of cloth samples, and collages assembled by Sudo herself. Tools and raw materials used in her practice are featured as part of the edition."

www.gwtoday.gwu.edu (accessed 8/22/2017): "Stainless steel, aluminum, bird feathers and bamboo may not seem like materials that would be incorporated into textiles – unless you’re talking about Japan’s Nuno Corporation, a force of creativity in Tokyo that has revolutionized how people think about fabrics.

www.silkweavingstudio.com (accessed 8/22/2017): "Nuno is the Japanese word for ‘cloth’ or ‘fabric.’ Junichi Arai started NUNO in 1984 and in 1987 Reiko Sudo took over as design director. She has continued to push boundaries with contemporary textiles. Reiko is involved in many projects creating small runs of textiles in collaboration with mills and factories in Japan in an effort to keep alive the strong textile skills and traditions in the country and make them available around the world.

"Nuno textiles are at the forefront of contemporary textile design. They represent a convergence of centuries-old traditions with advanced technologies ultimately transforming how we think about textiles today. Materials such as feathers, nails, paper, and copper become key components in their textile making.

"Born in 1953 in Ibaragi, Japan, Reiko Sudo is a contemporary textile designer renowned for ‘permanent pleating’ and for combining unlikely materials with weaving and textile production. She has been Nuno’s design director since 1987."

www.Ideasondesign.net (accessed 8/22/2017): "Renowned as a ‘weaver of new ideas’, Reiko Sudo is Co-founder, current CEO and Design Director of Nuno Corporation of Tokyo, universally recognized as one of the world’s most innovative textile companies. Nuno takes the techniques, materials and aesthetics of traditional textiles and re-interprets them with cutting-edge technologies.

"Reiko and her design team, together with the company’s skilled weavers and dyers, have greatly broadened the parameters of contemporary design in the textile industry, experimenting with an eclectic array of materials, ranging from silk, cotton and polyester to hand-made paper and aluminum, alongside finishing methods that include salt-shrinking, rust-dyeing and caustic burning. The results are distinctive, intriguing and indisputably remarkable textiles."
$5,000


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One Tree
By Gretchen C. Daily and Charles J. Katz, Jr.
Seattle, Washington: 2017, Marquand Editions. Edition of 25 + 3 display copies.

11.5 x 22.5" box in semicircular shape with nine color photographs and a wood carving of a tree. In slipcase. Signed and numbered by the author and the photographer.

WorldCat (UC Berkeley): "The carved tree is folded down to fit into a semicircular insert box to be pulled out and detached from the container slipcase. It opens up to reveal the One Tree (attached to the lid by a string that lifts it upright as the lid is lowered). Tree is cut from 3 layers of plywood laminated together and attached tongue-in-groove to the center edge. Photographs and 2 booklets reside in cut-out indentation also made of built up, laminated layers of plywood. Inside of lid is illustrated with watercolor printing. Slipcase includes 2 booklets: One tree / Gretchen C. Daily (14 pages; 21 x 15 cm, with additional signature by the author) and a supplementary booklet One tree / Gretchen C. Daily, Charles J. Katz Jr., which contains the foreword by Charles J. Katz Jr., acknowledgments, and artist bios (9 pages ; 21 x 15 cm), and 14 numbered color photographs by Charles J. Katz Jr."

Artists' book by ecologist and conservation biologist Gretchen C. Daily and photographer Charles J. Katz Jr. that presents one tree - a Ceiba pentandra growing in Sabalito, Costa Rica, also called Kapok or Silk-Cotton-Tree.

Marquand Editions: "In this remarkable edition, environmental scientist Gretchen C. Daily and photographer Charles J. Katz describe how one relict tree, the magnificent Ceiba pentandra in the village of Sabalito, carries physical and spiritual importance far out into the world. In poetic language interwoven with scientific fact, she also describes the historical and natural history of this tree and of the ceiba species in general. Katz's photographs of the tree and village amplify this message quietly yet forcefully."

woods.stanford.edu: "Gretchen Daily is Bing Professor of Environmental Science in the Department of Biology; Senior Fellow in the Woods Institute for the Environment; and Director of the Center for Conservation Biology. She is also Co-Director of The Natural Capital Project, a partnership among Stanford University, The Nature Conservancy, World Wildlife Fund, and the University of Minnesota, whose goal is to align economic forces with conservation.

"An ecologist by training, Daily's work spans scientific research, teaching, public education, and working with leaders to advance practical approaches to environmental challenges. Daily's scientific research is on biodiversity change; on the scope for harmonizing biodiversity conservation and agriculture; on quantifying the production and value of Ecosystem Services and Conservation across landscapes; and on new policy and finance mechanisms for integrating the values of natural capital into major decisions. Daily works extensively with private landowners, economists, lawyers, business people, and government agencies to incorporate environmental issues into business practice and public policy. Her efforts span fundamental research and policy-oriented demonstration projects in Africa, Asia, Latin America, North America, and Oceania."

Charles J. Katz Jr. has been an active photographer while pursuing a professional career as an attorney and business executive. He serves on the board of directors of the Nature Conservancy of Washington and on the boards of advisers for the Natural Capital Project, Stanford University’s Woods Institute for the Environment, and Stanford’s School of Earth Sciences.
$2,800


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The Magician
By Chris Byrne
Seattle, Washington: Marquand Editions, 2014. Edition of 20.

15 x 9.5 x 14" box containing 11 pieces. Box on casters and with slots for the 11 items. Accompanied by a hat (11.5" diameter, height 8") with electrical plug and connector.

Techniques: letterpress, inkjet and digital printing, variety of binding styles, video.

Marquand Editions: "Chris Byrne's obsessional graphic novel took a decade to realize and another two years to produce. He and designer Scott Newton worked with Paper Hammer Studios to construct an audaciously ambitious bit of publishing magic."

Paper Hammer Studios: "The Magician is an epic graphic novel, a bookmaking tour de force, a mesmerizing art object, and the completion of over a decade-long obsession of author Chris Byrne. This enigmatic box of wonders houses a dozen separate publications, printed and hand bound using a variety of techniques.

"The books include Theogony, Handmade, Down the Head, Mountain Man/She-Wolf, Letterpress Flipbook, 4-Ply Toilet Paper, Moleskine, The Magician Manual, M-Phase, Unfinished Versions, Colophon, and Curtains."

The work includes an upside-down velveteen-covered magician's hat. The brim of the hat lifts to reveal a black toilet seat, which in turn lifts to reveal an electric-powered "flame". A fan blows white fabric which is lighted in colors when the unit is plugged in.

Dan Nadel: The Comics Journal "A Conceptual Flush: The Magician": "In 1987, at the tail end of his undergraduate art studies, Chris Byrne began a comic strip called The Magician. He returned to it in 2000. But then it developed into something else, only just finished in January 2013: 12 objects housed in, and dependent on, a facsimile of a magician’s box.

"Byrne’s succinct description of The Magician … It’s set in a public bathroom. The Magician is this character that goes through and reconciles opposites. Every misunderstanding I have about the universe is documented in these objects. And creation myths, too. But it’s all tongue-in-cheek.

"The Magician takes different forms. He is a sleeping figure. He is a hand. He is sperm. He is a cape.

"Each book/object uses some element of stage magic in the Mandrake the Magician sense of the term. And each asks the viewer/user to in some way engage or create herself.

"The first book, 'Theogony', depicts a birth of the hermaphrodite, uses oversized panels and a transparent hourglass shape, as well as pages that open and shut, creating (bathroom) infographic transformations of time and shape in order to achieve the toilet expulsion of The Magician.

"Maybe the most successful book is 'Handmade', which summarizes the basic concerns of Byrne’s: birth, death, eating and sex, but using entirely the stuff of children’s art, like paper plate drawings, hand puppets, leaves and hand shadows. The same book depicts the actual hands (no longer shadow puppets) creating structures of heaven and hell. And still another uses the basic form of the toilet and corresponding plunger to tell yet another creation myth of birth in a toilet.

"Maybe the most successful object is a folded poster, which, once unfurled, simultaneously resembles a magician’s cape and the actual hermaphroditic physiology. Bowtie included.

"Another book makes card patterns from sheets of toilet paper. Cards form patterns not for any real meaning but because they can, and life becomes a pattern of one thing on top of another, on top of another, until the whole thing gets flushed.

"Then there are a series of comic strips printed on specimen slides, which can be viewed through the lens built into the box. The strips emulate cellular movement. Another birth, another melding of forms.

"A hardbound standard size 'sketchbook' containing Byrne’s studies for the objects and imagery functions not as a 'behind the scenes look' so much as an artifact like all the rest. As if someone sat there sketching the objects in the box – deciphering it.

"The box works because it’s not only a container. It provides a soundtrack (endless flushing) as well as a screen for an animation (figures flushing), not to mention a lens for viewing specimen slides.

"And so Byrne, playing dumb, uses 'Magician' not as a caricature but as a category. It’s like 'magician' because of course – in the hokey rabbit in the hat way, that’s how things are created. Something out of nothing: It’s magic. So we begin with a simple trick in which a hermaphrodite is created. And we move on and on."
$15,000


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A. Corkery Hahn
With essay by J.C. Caruso
Seattle, Washington: Paper Hammer, 2013. Edition of 100.

9 x 6.5"; 126 pages. Digitally printed. Handbound, Smyth Sewn. Cloth-covered boards with original unique stitched drawing inset into front board. Signed by the artist.

Lucia/Marquand: "Alan Corkery Hahn is a Seattle artist who harvests paper from old books and stitches drawings into them."

The volume contains a subset of the hundreds of similarly produced works created by Alan Corkery Hahn between 1998 and 2012. Each work uses only a tiny, straight stitch - the seed stitch.

Alan Corkery Hahn: Sewn Leaves, an exhibition at Paper Hammer (2013): "Seattle artist Alan Corkery Hahn creates embroidered doodles' on repurposed book pages and covers. Corkery Hahn works on a small scale, with tiny stitches on small sheets — most pieces measure about 5 x 7 inches, the size of a pocket paperback. … The images on each page vary, from everyday objects to portraits to abstract geometric shapes. An astronaut hops along the surface of one page, a pair of shoes graces the next.

"What’s incredible is that Corkery Hahn manages to craft each image with such precision and charm. In his statement, Corkery Hahn writes, 'the complexity of the lines confounds an impulse to simply dismiss the image as a mere doodle. Doodles they may be, freely drawing upon the whims of imagination with a nod and wink to the subconscious, but they are doodles with intention, doodles with weight.'”
$100


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Casting Shadows: Auguste Rodin
By Ted Wells
photography by John Ellis
Seattle, Washington: Guardian Stewardship Editions, 2012. Edition of 300.

6.5 x 12"; 72 pages. Papers: Mohawk Superfine, Neenah UV Ultra, GFSmith Colorplan, and Cave Paper. Printing techniques: digital, letterpress, and screen printing. Handbound cloth hardcover with screen-printed jacket. Signed on the title page by Wells, Ellis, and Marquand. Housed in 18 x 12" custom cardboard box with image of sculpture on lid. Slip and slot closure. Includes 18 x 12" screen-printed poster.

Lucia/Marquand: "This book explores the sensuous nature of Rodin's use of light and shadow in all of his sculptures, beautifully exemplified in this selection."

Ted Wells is an author and historian. He has curated museum exhibitions on numerous subjects and held lecturing posts in the U.S. and internationally.
$250

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Page last update: 09.04.17

 

   
  
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